Is this ‘Cape Town Tourist Guide’ locally accurate?

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Recently, publication The Travel published a guide to Cape Town, exploring the best seasons for tourists to visit, as well as activities and other necessities for travelers looking to venture into the mother city.

While most of the information was solid, I was very curious to read “Things to Know Before Visiting Cape Town”, writes Ashleigh Nefdt of Cape {town} Etc. Why not? I was thinking. It’s always interesting to see a place you know like your pocket through the eyes of another and decide if they were accurate or not.

Here are the points highlighted by The Travel in this category. “People talk very loudly”, “They will laugh at people who are vegan or vegetarian”, “Make sure you wear comfortable walking shoes”, “Cape Town is a safe place”, “Food is amazing”, “N ‘not enter a local cantonal taxi’.

“People talk very loudly”

Yes and no.

The author explains that speaking softly might be “considered gossip” and looked down upon in “the local culture”, and that “individuals speak loudly so that their discussions can be heard”. says the writer of our “local culture”.

What is the “local culture” when it comes to Cape Town? Given the melting pot of subcultures that make up South Africa, let alone Cape Town, it’s advisable not to pin everyone into one category. There are certain cultures and places where you will absolutely hear people talking at the top of their voices at varying volume intensities (anyone who has ever experienced Kalkies shouting an order in Kalk Bay will understand). Realistically, however, tourists certainly won’t need to overstate their talk, as for the most part Capetonians like South Africa understand (at least in theory) that everyone is different.

“They will laugh at people who are vegan or vegetarian”

Not necessarily.

Of all the most vegan or vegetarian friendly places in South Africa, Cape Town is at the forefront. Although the author notes that vegans/vegetarians will not be judged, the article adds that “it’s funny that many South Africans consider chicken a vegetable.”

On the contrary, we have a whole community of vegans and vegetarians in Cape Town who take their vegetables incredibly seriously. As for the “chicken” joke, it comes from Afrikaans culture in a tongue-in-cheek play that only locals would have as humor if not explained.

“Make sure you wear comfortable shoes”

Absolutely.

As with any place with so much to see, comfortable footwear is essential in a Capetonian starter kit.

“Cape Town is a safe place”

Well…

In order to keep tourists safe, anyone traveling to Cape Town should definitely understand that the city is an accumulation of very different places. The outskirts of the city versus downtown versus the Atlantic coast is, realistically, incredibly diverse in terms of security.

While the news may offer newcomers a terrifying picture of certain places, it’s also not entirely accurate to downplay them.

As the author indicates, using common sense is always important as everywhere in the world. However, common sense in a first world country is very different from common sense in places where crime is more prevalent. The best safety tips most locals will give you are to understand the different areas well before visiting (i.e. know which ones have the most incidents), never walk alone, especially not the night, and travel in groups as much as you can. If you have the option of driving instead of walking, continue your cruise.

“The food is amazing”

Absolutely correct. Cape Town’s food culture is unlike any other, especially when you try real Cape Town food. Dip into a Cape Malay Curry, sample fresh Fish and Chips from one of the ports and, by all means, hit up a braai if you get the chance.

“Don’t get in a local taxi”

It depends on the traveler.

If you are looking for an authentic and authentic scenario, taking a taxi trip will definitely be an experience like no other. However, if your idea of ​​a taxi is closer to what you know in your own country, then Ubering is probably more for you.

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Picture: @justvon09

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